Puzzle Reward

Thrifty Thursday----Puzzle Reward

This Thrifty Thursday idea is quick and easy.  

It seemed like I was always looking for another way to motivate students, especially around the holidays or when spring fever hit. For this idea, all you need is a small jigsaw puzzle from the dollar store and some sticky-back magnets.  Put a piece of magnet on the back of each puzzle piece and you have an instant class motivator!

Here’s the How-to:
1.  You'll need one jigsaw puzzle.  I used one with 24 pieces, but they come in different sizes. You'll also need sticky-back magnets.  I found this package of two sheets at Walmart for about $3.00.  I like them because the magnets are thin.  They also have magnetic tape and small circle magnets. 
  

2.  I cut one magnet sheet into small pieces. Check the space you have on one of the puzzle pieces.  You want the magnet to fit on the back without overlapping into the open space where another piece will fit. The thin sheet cut very easily with a paper cutter.



3.   Now you're all set to begin.  Choose one area of your white board to collect the pieces and build the puzzle.  If you don’t have a magnetic white board you can use a cookie tin or other magnetic surface.
4.   Decide on the reward the class will earn when all the puzzle is finished.  It's a good idea to write the goal in the same area where you'll build the puzzle.

5.   When the class is doing what they’re supposed to be doing, choose someone to add a puzzle piece to the board.  At first the puzzle pieces will just be placed on the board.  But, as more pieces are earned the kids will begin to see where one piece attaches to another piece.


6.  Keep track of the students who get to add a piece.  You can keep an envelope nearby with student name slips.  After you choose one name, don't put that slip back in the envelope.

Alternate idea:  Choose a focus behavior.  Perhaps the class is being a bit too chatty.  Set that as the behavior you're looking for.  When you see someone working quietly, or standing in line without talking, etc.  Ask them to add a piece to the puzzle.  Sometimes I would choose a different focus behavior each day, depending on areas of need.




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